Prop A – Let Voters Decide Makes Sense, Unless You are a Big Government Supporter!

It’s interesting to see and read some of the opposition rants about Proposition A – Let Voters Decide. These rants run from “untruthiness,” aka outright lies, to unknowing revelations of truth.

The latest in what has become a long run of “we didn’t mean to say it but we did” statements can be found in an article in the Truman State University Index on Proposition A.

In the article, Melanie Smith, community service director for the city of Kirksville is quoted as saying,

…the Council does not support this proposition because it wants to reserve the right to implement an earnings tax in the future (emphasis added). Smith said the council has no plans of implementing one, but it doesn’t want the state to tell it how it can and can’t implement taxes.

Later in the article, incumbent State Representative Rebecca McClanahan (D)

…said during a question-and-answer interview with the Index that she does not support the proposition because Missouri communities should have the right to institute an earnings tax.

McClanahan said she also doesn’t support Prop. A because it would limit the ability of communities like Kirksville to use an earnings tax to fund projects like the four-lane highway between Macon and Kirksville, which was funded with an increased sales tax.

Newsflash to Melanie, Representative McClanahan and the Municipal League, the state already tells you how you can and can’t implement taxes!  I suggest you would benefit greatly from a basic local government primer on taxes.  Your deceptive “read” of the measure is shameful!

It’s obvious the opponents of Proposition A – Let Voters Decide don’t want voters to decide.  The more municipal officials say they have “no plans” for an earnings tax, the more residents should be concerned about having one.

Representative McClanahan is also quoted as saying,

“So I not only have trouble with the impact that it would have, but I also have trouble with how it got there. Because I’m not sure that one person should have that kind of power over every single community in Missouri.”

Newsflash for Representative McClanahan – over 210,000 people across Missouri put it on the ballot not just one person! And, it will be We the People who determine the tax policy for the state not just one person.  Unless of course, Representative McClanahan is joining the ranks of the other opposition to Proposition A who thinks you and I are too stupid to figure all this out! It’s the only explanation for those who claim “one person” is determining the outcome.

Unfortunately, this is not the first time Representative McClanahan has demonstrated she has a problem with letting voters decide.  She voted to restrict our ability to place items on the ballot when she voted for House Bill (HB) 1788 (page 996-997). HB 1788 would have severely impacted the ability of We the People to place measures on the ballot.  This is a provision We the People reserved for ourselves in our State Constitution. Representative McClanahan voted to limit our say on our Constitution and laws!

Besides supporting the lies of the “organized” opposition who make false statements about taxes going up if Proposition A is passed — not one tax is changed up or down in Proposition A — Representative McClanahan and municipal leaders across the state seek to mislead the people into voting against OUR best interest in better government and limited taxation.  Representative McClanahan and others should be ashamed. Problem is, they are not!

Carl Bearden
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2 Responses to “Prop A – Let Voters Decide Makes Sense, Unless You are a Big Government Supporter!”

  1. Alice says:

    Did someone forget to mention to these folks the factoid about they do not have the authority to implement an earnings tax–NOW, therefore, the community service director, isn’t ‘reserving’ anything …
    Prop A “closes the loophole” and protects voters (aka taxpayers)from cities forcing an earnings tax on them.

    • Carl Bearden says:

      They have been told that on a number of occasions but most don’t really pay attention. Organizations like the Municipal League make it sound to them as though something is being taken away from them. It’s not.

      Unfortunately, part-time municipal officials lean way too heavily on staff and don’t always ask the “so what?” question.